Improve Your Health With Wine

Sometimes after a long, hard day, sitting down with a nice glass of red wine just feels right. Of course, just as with most things, moderation is important. Drinking wine in large amounts regularly does more harm than good, BUT a glass here and there can actually add to your overall health.

Cholesterol

High-fiber Tempranillo red grapes—which are used to make certain red wines can actually have a positive effect on cholesterol levels, according to a study from the Universidad Complutense de Madrid in Spain.

Healthy study participants who consumed the same grape supplement found in red wine saw their LDL, or “bad cholesterol,” levels decrease by 9% among healthy. Participants with high cholesterol experienced a drop of 12%. High levels of LDL is what can cause arteries to stiffen and blood pressure to rise, so it’s important to be sure you keep that in check. Great news is, red wine in moderation can help with that!

Improved Memory
Resveratrol, found in red wine, may be key to keeping your memory sharp, says Philippe Marambaud, PhD, a senior research scientist at New York’s Litwin-Zucker Research Center for the Study of Alzheimer’s Disease and Memory Disorders. It has been shown to hinder the formation of beta-amyloid protein, which is a plaque found in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s.

Immune Boost

A 2010 study in the American Journal of Epidemiology found that among 4,000 faculty members at five Spanish universities, those who drank more than 14 weekly glasses of wine for a year were 40% less likely to come down with a common cold. Antioxidants found in red wine are believed to fight infection and protect cells against the effects of free radicals, which may play role in cancer and other diseases.

Clearer Skin

Resveratrol, found in red wine, is able to inhibit the growth of acne-causing bacteria longer than benzoyl peroxide. Topical application on the skin is not as effective. Resveratrol must be ingested for maximum efficacy.

DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.

Avoid Cold & Flu This Winter

‘Tis the season – cold & flu season. It seems the Northeast is getting hit very hard this year with all sorts of illnesses: flu, strep, stomach bug, you name it. As a certified health coach, I believe many illnesses commonly suffered can be avoided by making simple dietary changes and supplementing with natural immune support when needed. Rather than relying on pharmacies and prescriptions, I like to give my body the natural support it needs to fight off illness and feel its best. When your body is functioning optimally, it is much less likely to get sick, and if you do get sick, the duration will be much shorter.

Some of my all time favorite winter supplements include:

  • Organic Elderberry Syrup: A powerful antiviral that tastes great too! Perfect for fighting off the flu.
  • Garlic: Anti-microbial power that is great for boosting the immune system. It’s most powerful when eaten raw, so I like to chop it up and use in in dips like guacamole and hummus.
  • Young Living Thieves Essential Oil: An anti-microbial blend of essential oils that supports the immune system. I like to diffuse it to clear the air of germs, clean with it, apply it to the soles of my feet to prevent illness and it can also be taken internally as well.
  • Epsom Salt Bath: A relaxing way to pull toxins out of the body. I like to mix lavender essential oil to boost relaxation and reduce stress as well.
  • Probiotics: Replenishing your body’s “good” bacteria will help you to fight off the “bad” bacteria that cause illness. Improving the function of your gut is vital, as this is where the majority of your immune system dwells.
  • Alive Organic Vitamin C powder: Vitamin C can help reduce the duration and severity of colds. Unlike many chemically processed vitamins, this food-based supplement is easily assimilated and digested.

Of course, supplements are great to help support your body, but it is also essential that you maintain a healthy, balanced diet to keep your body feeling its best. Reducing or eliminating sugar is essential to good health. One of the reasons so many people get sick during the holidays is because of the high consumption of sugar, which compromises the immune system. I also like to suggest limiting or eliminating dairy products, as these are mucous producing, which is obviously not ideal during cold and flu season. You don’t have to live a life of total deprivation but making sure your diet and supplementation focuses on whole foods, with little processed “junk” food can really work wonders for your health! Here’s to a happy, healthy winter!

DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.

How to Find the Running Shoes That Suit You Best

By Lauren Bowen

Running is easily one of the healthiest things you can do for your body. It can raise your levels of good cholesterol, improve your lung function and even prevents cancers like breast and colon cancer from developing!

However, a bad pair of running shoes can instantly take your run from excellent exercise to injury. The wrong kind can hurt you; the right kind can propel you toward running success!

But how do you know which shoes to choose? Here’s what you need to know.

How to Find the Running Shoes That Suit You Best

1) Know Your Needs

Every runner lives a different lifestyle, and running shoes are designed to meet specific needs. Start by determining the type of running you do (or the type of running you want to do).

Do you exclusively run on pavement? Or are you more the type to hit the trails? Do you run long distances that require a little extra support? Or are you mostly looking for a cross-training shoe that can be used in the gym?

Here are your options:

  • Road-running shoes
  • Trail-running shoes
  • Cross-training shoes

2) Nail the Fit

Well-fitting running shoes should feel snug, but not tight. Experts suggest that you should be able to slide your feet out without untying them. Here are a few more tips to help you nail the fit:

Heel: Choose a shoe that allows a small amount of heel movement without too much slippage. You don’t want any rubbing or irritation!

Instep: Avoid any shoe that feels tight or pressured in the ball of the foot. Your toes need enough space to spread naturally. Think the shoe feels right in all other ways? Maybe try lacing it up a different way before you give up on it.

Width: In a properly-fitted shoe, you should be able to pinch approximately a quarter of an inch of material or so at the widest part of your foot. If it’s too narrow, you will feel your pinky toe bumping up against the side. Avoid this!

Length: When choosing your shoe size, keep in mind that your feet will swell over the course of your run. Give yourself approximately one thumb’s width of space to the end of the shoe when standing.

Flexibility: A nicely fitting shoe will flex where your foot flexes. Ensure that it creases at the same point or you may experience pain in your arches.

3) Understand Your Tendencies

Every runner is unique, and we all have funny tendencies! Check the wear on your former pair of running shoes. Do you see heavier wear along the inside edge of your shoe? You may be overpronating (running with an exaggerated inward roll). Do you see more wear on the outside edge? Odds are you’re experiencing supination, or outward rolling.

If you run with overpronation: Overpronation is fairly common in runners. Look for a shoe with stability control—sometimes called an ‘outer post’—to help guard against knee pain and injury due to overpronation.

If you run with under-pronation/supination: Look for a shoe with extra cushioning and flexibility to help reduce impact.

4) Test Your Choices

If you are fortunate enough to shop at a specialty running store, be sure to get the advice of a sales associate when you’re there! Try the treadmill each time you test a new pair of shoes, then have the specialist record your run in slow motion. This can give you excellent insight into your running tendencies.

Second, it’s always a good idea to try running in every pair you try. Don’t settle for just walking around the store.

What Not To Do

It’s so easy to rush into a bad purchase if you get sidetracked by one of the following common mishaps. Don’t fall into these traps!

  • Buying for looks. Buy what feels good, not what looks cool. It’s so easy to ignore the fit in favor of the one you like the look of.
  • Shopping too early in the day. Shop when your feet are at their warmest (at the end of the day) so you don’t risk buying a size too small.
  • Buying shoes that are too small. People can be self-conscious about the size of their feet. Don’t buy in your vanity size; buy what fits!
  • Assuming your size without testing a few. The size you usually wear in a street shoe may not be the perfect fit in a running shoe. Try a variety!

In general, a good pair of running shoes should last you for between 400 and 500 miles of running. If you’re a regular runner, this is probably 3-4 months or so. So take the investment seriously!

Source: Care2.com | not affiliated with Aetrex Worldwide

Why brisk walking is good for weight loss

By Promita Mukherjee

So you have a hectic schedule and have no time to go to the gym or do outdoorsy exercises? Or is the membership to the fancy gym prohibitively expensive? Why not just get up and walk? You don’t need any equipment or a designated place to walk. Just put on a pair of good trainers and get off your couch! Here are a few reasons why brisk walking will be good for you if you are trying to lose weight:

High-intensity training

Brisk walking is more effective than a regular slow-paced walk. A study by researchers from the University of Virginia found that women who did three shorter, fast-paced walks a week (plus two longer, moderate-paced ones) lost five times more belly fat than those who simply strolled at a moderate speed five days a week.

Increases metabolic rate

Walking at a faster speed tricks your body into dipping into your fat stores for energy. In the process, you build muscles and raise your basal metabolic rate which helps you burn more calories throughout the day even when you aren’t exercising.

Good for the heart

Brisk walking is good cardio and lowers the levels of LDL (bad cholesterol), increasing the levels of HDL which is good for the heart. According to The Stroke Association, a brisk 30-minute walk daily helps control high blood pressure and reduces the chances of stroke by 27 per cent.

Tones your legs, glutes and tummy

Walking tones your calves, quads and hamstrings and lifts the glutes. If you walk at an incline, it is all the more effective. Maintain a good posture while walking as that will help tone the abs and waist as well.

Boosts memory

A study by The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that brisk walking for 40 minutes thrice a week could increase the volume of the hippocampus by two per cent. Walking will also slow down dwindling of mental skills associated with old age.

Source: Femina | not affiliated with Aetrex Worldwide

What’s Worse: Going To Bed Hungry Or Snacking Late At Night?

By Macaela Mackenzie

We’ve all been here: It’s 9:30 p.m., you’ve got 30 minutes left of The Bachelor before bed, and suddenly you’re craving cookies—should you suck it up until morning or do you indulge in that late-night snack?

Of course, according to the experts, the answer isn’t so simple.

“For optimal sleep it’s best not to go to bed too hungry or too full,” says Lisa Moskovitz, R.D. On one hand, falling asleep when all you can think about is the pit in your stomach is difficult AF. But eating too late can wreak havoc on your bod. “Eating late at night, right before you hit the hay can cause poor digestion issues, bloating, and inadequate sleep, which can lead to decreased energy levels and fatigue,” she says. Plus, over time, crappy sleep can lead to weight gain—especially if you’re habitually eating empty or excess calories at night, she says.

To find the perfect balance, rate your hunger on a scale of one to 10, where one is stuffed and 10 is starving. If you’re above a six, you’re better off having a bedtime snack before you catch your Z’s—as long as it’s under 200 calories, says Moskovitz. If your hunger is at a five or below, “have a glass of water or hot tea and call it a night,” she says. “For most, eating after dinner is usually not caused by true hunger but out of boredom or stress.”

If you really are experiencing late-night hunger pains, reach for a low-cal, whole-grain snack like whole-wheat toast, high-fiber cereal, or popcorn. “Whole-grain carbs help release serotonin in the brain, which make you feel calm and ready for sleep,” Moskovitz says. Whatever you do, stay away from high-protein or high-fat foods—that means no peanut butter on that toast and no buttery popcorn—since they take longer to digest and can disrupt your sleep.

Source: Women’s Health Magazine | not affiliated with Aetrex Worldwide

Exercise Is Not The Best Key To Weight Loss

By Lizette Borreli

We’ve all heard that to lose weight we need to do two things: eat less, exercise more. This makes sense: Burning more calories than we consume will lead to weight loss. But this exercise-based approach provides only short-term results. Now, researchers at Loyola University of Chicago confirm that a healthy diet, not exercise, is the key to losing weight — and keeping it off.

“Our study results indicate that physical activity may not protect you from gaining weight,” said Lara Dugas, lead author of the study and an assistant professor in the Department of Public Health Sciences of Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, in a statement.

Previous research has found exercise does help people lose weight by burning fat. A 10-month study split 141 obese or overweight people into three groups to see how cardio affected them — group 1 had to burn 400 calories doing cardio, 5 days a week; group 2 had to burn 600 calories doing cardio, 5 days a week; and group 3 did no exercise. Most participants lost 4.3 percent of their body weight in group 1; group 2 lost a little more at 5.7 percent; and the control group actually gained 0.5 percent.

The benefits of exercise on weight are notable, but most studies don’t take into account its behavioral effects. For example, working out makes people hungrier, which means they are more likely to consume more calories. This suggests how much and what we eat has a bigger impact on our weight than exercise.

In the new study, published in Peer J, Dugas and her colleagues examined about 2,000 adults from the U.S. and four other countries: Ghana, South Africa, Jamaica and Seychelles, to measure their physical activity levels and weight change throughout the course of three years. Participants wore tracking devices — accelerometers — on their waists for a week, to track their energy expenditure and step count. Weight, height, and body fat were also measured at baseline, one year and two years after.

In the beginning, Ghana participants had the lowest average weights (139 pounds for both men and women), and Americans the highest weights (202 pounds for women, 206 pounds for men). Ghanaians were more fit han Americans; 76 Ghanaian men and 44 percent Ghanaian women met the U.S. Surgeon General physical activity guidelines, while only 44 percent of American men and 20 percent of American women met the guidelines. Adults need 2 hours and 30 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity, like brisk walking, each week, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Surprisingly, participants with higher rates of physical activity actually gained more weight than those with lower rates. American men who met the guidelines gained a half pound per year, while American men who did not meet the guidelines lost 0.6 pounds. This shows there’s no significant relationship between sedentary time at baseline, and subsequent weight gain or weight loss. The only factors that were significantly linked to weight at baseline were age and gender.

“From our study it is not evident that higher volumes of PA [physical activity] alone are protective against future weight gain, and by deduction our data suggest that other environmental factors such as the food environment may have a more critical role,” concluded the researchers.

Exercise-focused weight loss regimens yield low success rates because we tend to poorly estimate calories we consume and calories we burn. For example, a 2010 study found when participants were asked to consume the amount of food they believed they burned in calories, they ended up eating two to three times the amount of calories they burned. This suggests calorie expenditure doesn’t really count for much.

Diet is a major factor in weight control; portion sizes and what we’re eating is crucial to maintaining a healthy body weight. To lose weight and improve health, we need to both eat well and find the time to exercise.

Source: Dugas LR, Kliethermes S, Plange-Rhule J et al. Accelerometer-measured physical activity is not associated with two-year weight change in African-origin adults from five diverse populations. Peer J. 2017.

Source: Medical Daily | not affiliated with Aetrex Worldwide

Women’s shoes must match foot type

By Dr. Robert F. Weiss

In the past, I’ve written about women’s running shoes, but lately there have been questions regarding information on ladies dress and/or casual shoes. The fact of the matter is, that many of the shoes that women are wearing are not the right fit for their foot type, which could lead to deformities as well as injuries. This is a problem we see all too often, particularly after the summer-fall wearing of sandals and/or flip-flops.

The most common dilemma is arch-heel pain and joint pain in the ball of the foot. This can cause friction to the nerves between the joints and a painful pinched nerve. This will result in burning and cramping of the toes. It is most important to look for shoes that fit your foot type. There are three types of foot structures, flat feet, feet with medium arch and feet with high arch.

In the flat foot type, ladies should look for a shoe that has a bit of an arch support. A flat shoe would not be a good choice for a flat foot. Those with a high arch foot will do well with a higher heel for support and more comfort.

Those with a medium arch are luckier to be able to wear a variety of shoes. But keep in mind that we all need some support in the arch. No one likes pain, so if you take care in your selection of the proper shoe that will match your foot type, you could avoid suffering from pain in the ankles, knees and lower back.

When shopping for shoes check to make sure you have a stiff heel counter and that the shoe bends in the forefoot area. Foot type must be considered before the proper shoe choice can be made.

Source: The Hour | not affiliated with Aetrex Worldwide

Aetrex dress, casual, and athletic shoes offer the proper support and cushioning your feet need to help prevent foot pain and promote proper body alignment.  To further address your foot care needs depending on your foot type, get a free foot scan in a store near you using our store locator here.

Aetrex’s patented iStep Foot Scanning technology quickly identifies your arch type, foot size, and pressure points to determine the ideal orthotic support for your needs.

Healthy Valentine’s Day Cookies

I was looking for a Valentine’s treat that would taste amazing but not throw me too far off track on my healthy eating. I was so excited to find these delicious healthy sugar cookies!

Ingredients

  • 2 cup Blanched Almond Flour
  • 6 Tbsp Coconut Flour
  • 2 Tbsp Arrowroot Powder
  • 1/8 tsp Baking Soda
  • 1/8 tsp Sea Salt
  • 1/4 cup Organic [*Spectrum Brand, sustainably sourced] Palm Oil Shortening
  • 1/2 cup Raw Honey
  • 1 whole Pastured Eggs
  • 1 tsp Pure Vanilla Extract
  • 2 Tbsp Raspberry Juice

Find the full recipe HERE.

 

Improving Your Foot Health With Your Socks

Well, according to the groundhog, there is still plenty of winter ahead of us this year. That means sandal season is quite a way off! It’s important to remember that socks are important foot health accessories. Damp and dark conditions, such as those found in shoes, promote the growth of fungi, bacteria and odor – eew!

You can protect your feet by wearing socks made with copper fibers that have been clinically proven to help eliminate these common problems and improve your skin’s appearance and texture. Copper ions, embedded in the yarn and guaranteed to last for the life of the sock, provide superior protection and eliminate 99.9% of bacteria, fungi and odors commonly found in feet.

In addition to eliminating the bacteria, germs etc in your shoes, it’s important to choose socks that also offer the proper support and help to keep your feet dry and healthy. I don’t know about you, but my feet totally know the difference between cheap socks and good quality socks. I feel like my athletic performance improves when my feet feel their most comfortable. Below are a few key attributes to look for when choosing athletic socks.

  • Added heel to toe cushioning for superior shock absorption
  • Elasticized arch support for added performance
  • Reduces friction to help prevent blistering
  • Technologically advanced Moisture-Guard wicking system
  • Helps controls odor and rejuvenates your skin

If you have Diabetes, it’s very important to be sure that you select socks that will help protect your overall foot health and minimize potential injuries.  Below are a few key attributes to look for when choosing socks for those with Diabetes.

  • Non-binding yarn with Spandex hugs leg without restriction
  • Hand linked smooth toe seam for extra protection
  • Technologically advanced Moisture-Guard wicking system
  • Extra cushioning option for superior comfort & shock absorption
  • Doctor recommended for diabetes

If you suffer from varicose veins, swollen legs, post surgery, or moderate edema, you may benefit from compression socks. Below are a few key attributes to look for when choosing compression socks.

  • Graduated compression from ankle to knee (20-25mmHg)
  • Energizing action for all day comfort
  • Reduces swelling and leg fatigue

It’s just as important to select the proper socks as it is to select the proper footwear. When your feet feel great, you feel great!

Below are some link to where you can find great socks, all of which are embedded with copper ions to create the healthiest environment possible for your feet.

To purchase Men’s Copper socks, click here.

To purchase Women’s Copper socks, click here.

DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.

This Supplement Reduces Stress & Anxiety Naturally

Have you ever heard of Ashwagandha, also known as Indian Ginseng or Winter Cherry? Did you know it is a powerful plant that has been used in Ayurvedic medicine for over 3,000 years? In Sanskrit, Ashwagandha means the odor of a horse. It is named so because the roots seem to smell like a horse. So we know it smells pretty awful just from the name. However, the health benefits far outweigh the less than desirable aroma (that’s what capsules are for).

Ashwagandha has powerful anti-inflammatory powers. It has been found to be especially useful in treating rheumatologic problems because it decreases inflammation and pain.

It has also been identified as a possible anti-carcinogen, being used in the field of oncology because of its cancer killing properties, in addition to radiation therapy and chemotherapy. It has also been said to reduce the side effects of chemotherapy without interfering with the tumor cell-killing activity.

According to Ayurveda, Ashwagandha is also effective in managing bacterial infections in humans because of its antibacterial properties. Studies have shown that Ashwagandha was effective in urinogenital, gastrointestinal, and respiratory tract infections when consumed orally.

This powerful plant has also been used as a remedy for diabetes in Ayurvedic medicine. Experiments showed that blood sugar levels during fasting and post-meal decreased significantly when Ashwagandha was comsumed for a period of four weeks.

One of my personal favorite uses for Ashwagandha is to reduce stress. It  can be used to create a soothing and calming effect on a person. In our modern world where stress is causing all sorts of health issues, it’s nice to know there are natural alternatives to medication that can help to keep us balanced.

As I mentioned earlier, Ashwagandha root doesn’t have the nicest smell. That’s why I like that it is available in various forms so you can take it whatever way best fits your personal lifestyle. It is available in powdered form, dried form, or fresh root form. I personally like to buy it in capsules that can be easily taken without having to taste the root. As with anything you ingest, I recommend purchasing organic whenever possible.

DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.