Ginger Turmeric Detox Tea (from organicfoodshealth.com)

Ginger Turmeric Detox Tea

This is a delicious tea that can aid the body in releasing impurities. It’s a great way to refresh your body and help keep your energy up!

Ingredients:

  • 2 inch knob of ginger
  • 2-3 inch piece of turmeric root
  • 1-2 dashes of cayenne pepper
  • 4 organic lemons (3 for juicing and 1 for using as a garnish)
  • 3 drops of vanilla stevia
  • 2 quarts of water

Mix all ingredients and enjoy!

Get That Natural Glow…Scrub Your Skin

Your skin is your body’s largest organ. It’s important to take good care of your skin, keeping it exfoliated, moisturized and protected. People ask me all the time how I get my skin to glow from within.

First of all, I drink A TON of water, about a gallon a day. Keeping my body hydrated helps keep the elasticity in my skin. Dehydrated skin will appear, rough, wrinkled and saggy. Properly hydrated skin appears dewy, plump and smooth.

Homemade skin scrub is another secret weapon in my “glow” arsenal. For pennies, you can make a very effective body scrub with staples you probably already have in your pantry. My favorite, simple recipe is to mix 1 cup sugar (born or white) with 1/2 cup of olive or coconut oil. Then I add in 5-10 drops of lavender essential oil to give it a nice aroma and help relax me. I simply scrub my skin (body and face) every other day before I shower to keep it exfoliated and glowing.

As the weather heats up, more of your skin will be showing. Regular exfoliation with a scrub will help keep your skin looking and feeling its best. Be sure to take good care of your body and it will be good to you!

Crazy Good Coconut Oil “Chocolate” Bark (courtesy of www.ohsheglows.com)

“This homemade chocolate is made with just a few essential ingredients – virgin coconut oil, cocoa or cacao powder, and pure maple syrup. (Feel free to use whichever liquid sweetener you prefer). The virgin coconut oil replaces the cocoa butter found in traditional chocolate so while it needs to be kept in the freezer, it’s a great way to sneak some coconut oil into your day. You can also use any toppings you’d like – dried fruit, nuts, + seeds all work lovely. It melts much faster than regular chocolate, so be sure to keep it chilled until ready to enjoy. I prefer it straight from the freezer.”

YIELD: 20 PIECES
Ingredients:
  • 1/4 cup raw hazelnuts
  • 1/4 cup raw almonds
  • 1/3 cup large flake dried coconut
  • 1/2 cup virgin coconut oil
  • 1/2 cup cocoa or cacao powder, sifted if necessary
  • 1/4 cup pure maple syrup
  • 1 tablespoon smooth almond butter, optional
  • pinch fine sea salt

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 300F. Line a 9″ square pan or a small baking sheet with two pieces of parchment paper, one going each way. Set aside.
  2. Add hazelnuts and almonds on a baking sheet and roast in the oven for 10 minutes. Remove baking sheet and add the coconut flakes and spread out. Continue roasting the nuts and coconut flakes for another 3-4 minutes, or until the coconut is lightly golden. Watch closely to avoid burning – coconut burns fast!
  3. Place hazelnuts on several sheets of damp paper towel. Wrap the hazelnuts and rub them vigorously with the paper towel until the skins fall off. It’s ok if some skins don’t come off. Discard the skins and roughly chop the hazelnuts and almonds.
  4. In a medium saucepan, melt the coconut oil over low heat. Remove from heat and whisk in the cocoa (or cacao) powder, maple syrup, and almond butter (if using) until smooth. Add a pinch of sea salt to taste. Stir in half of the almonds and hazelnuts.
  5. With a spatula, spoon the chocolate mixture onto the prepared parchment-lined pan or sheet and smooth out until it’s about 1/4-1/2 inch thick. Sprinkle on the remaining nuts and all of the coconut flakes. Place into freezer on a flat surface for about 15 minutes, until frozen solid.
  6. Once frozen, break apart into bark. Store in the freezer until ready to eat. I don’t recommend keeping it out on the counter long because it melts fast.

Tip: To make this nut-free, simply omit the almond butter, hazelnuts, and almonds. It will still turn out just fine! You can try adding toasted sunflower seeds on top for a little crunch.

Read more: http://ohsheglows.com/2015/03/18/crazy-good-coconut-oil-chocolate-bark/#ixzz3ZHsszxch

Why Forgiveness Helps You Heal

Have you ever downed an entire package of chips, crackers, or cookies? Ate pizza or cake until you felt sick? Drank more coffee or wine than your body wanted?

Do you remember how you were feeling at the time?

I ask because sometimes we overeat to help distract us from emotional pain. Think about it—have you noticed that sometimes when you overeat you’re not hungry at all? What you are is lonely. Or angry. Or sad. Or resentful. Or frustrated. Or something else.

So what hurt are YOU holding on to?

Tap Into the Power of Forgiveness

Wouldn’t it be more effective to address your uncomfortable feelings? The best, most thorough, most divinely perfect way to do that is forgiveness.

Forgiving is not easy, even for the most enlightened among us. If you’ve been allowing your present health to be controlled by past hurts, I urge you to commit to forgiving. These steps can help:

  • Talk to sympathetic friends and family about your desire to forgive. Chatting with others is tremendously comforting.
  • Write a letter to the person you’d like to forgive. You can decide whether or not you send it.
  • See the situation from the other person’s perspective—your own perspective may change.
  • Don’t forget to forgive yourself. Sometimes we can be harshest with ourselves.
  • Understand that you are responsible for your own attitude. Don’t let holding a grudge keep you from feeling free, open, and powerful in your own life.

Forgive and watch how much easier your relationship with eating becomes.

Primary Foods…What’s Eating You?

One of my favorite concepts I learned while attending IIN is the idea of primary foods. Nutrition is actually our secondary source of energy. Primary foods, or non-food sources of nourishment, are what really fuel us as human beings.

As children, we all lived on primary food. Lovers thrive on the pure bliss and peace they are experiencing, while passionate entrepreneurs are fueled by their work. The excitement and rapture of daily life can feed us more completely than any food.

Imagine children playing outside with friends. At dinnertime their mother calls to them, “Time to come in and eat!” “No mommy, I’m not hungry yet,” they respond. At the table, the mother dutifully ensures that the children leave no morsel behind. The children reluctantly force down the minimum requirement, eager to get back outside and play.

At the end of the day they return, exhausted and satisfied. They quickly fall asleep without thinking about food at all.

Can you remember being deeply in love? Everything is light and warm, colors are vivid, and life is full of joy. You’re high off your lover’s presence, sustained and exhilarated by the blissful connection. You float on air, and food becomes secondary.

Think back to a time when you were involved in an exciting work project. You believed in what you were doing whole-heartedly and felt confident and stimulated. Time stopped, and the outside world was muted – food was an afterthought.

Now recall a time you were depressed or experiencing low self-esteem – you were starving for primary food. No matter how much you ate, you never felt satisfied. The need for love, power, or mere acknowledgement drove the desire for excess food.

Primary food goes beyond the plate, nurturing us on a deeper level. The four main primary foods are:

  • career
  • relationships
  • physical activity
  • spirituality

The more primary food we give ourselves, the less we depend on secondary food. On the contrary, the more we fill ourselves with secondary food, the less space we leave for primary food – our true source of nourishment.

Many religions and cultures practice fasting to reduce secondary food, opening channels to receive a greater amount of primary food.

Take some quality time to explore your personal balance between primary food and secondary food – which area could use some attention?