Keep Your Tongue Clean & Healthy

Tongue cleaners are simple and inexpensive yet completely transformative. They are usually thin, U-shaped devices made of stainless steel or plastic, consisting of a blunt edge that removes build-up from the surface of the tongue.

Dentists throughout the world recommend the tongue cleaner because it helps fight cavities by removing bacteria from food and drink. The tongue cleaner also prevents bad breath, especially common in people who eat a lot of dairy and red meat. This tool reduces excess mucus in the mouth, and in turn the nose and throat.

The tongue cleaner originated in Ayurveda, which says that people who use it are more expressive and thoughtful, better public speakers, and more sincere and authoritative conversationalists.

Some people ask if they can reap the same benefits by brushing their tongue with a stiff toothbrush. Tongue brushing moves food particles and bacteria around and can be helpful, but a tongue cleaner is far more efficient, since it removes deep bacteria deposits and thoroughly stimulates the area.

Cleaning the tongue of leftover food and bacteria reduces cravings greatly. When the taste of food is still in your mouth, you’re more likely to crave foods from the opposite extreme of what you last ate. For example, if you had an intensely savory meal, you’re more likely to crave strong sweets.

Tongue cleaners resensitize your taste buds, allowing you to experience subtle flavors more fully. This makes basic foods like whole grains, fruits, and vegetables taste more delicious than ever. These simple foods will begin to bring you greater satisfaction, leading you to eat less.

Last, but certainly not least, tongue cleaning enhances kissing by making the tongue more fresh, sensitive, and sweet. If you’re in a relationship, try tongue scraping two times a day after brushing your teeth, and encourage your partner to do the same. You’ll probably notice a dramatic difference!

Directions:

  • Apply a few quick strokes, 2-3 times a day, or after brushing your teeth.
  • Use the round edge to scrape gently down the tongue several times, while applying slight pressure.
  • Rinse under running water and gently scrape again until no white residue is left.
  • There should be no pain or gagging involved – if you feel any discomfort, you’re probably scraping too hard or starting too far back on the tongue.
  • If you’re wondering what those bumps are at the back of your tongue, they’re your salivary glands and they’re meant to be there. If you found them, you’ve gone too far.

DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.

What is Causing Your Bad Breath?

While there are several causes of bad breath, one that is often overlooked and rarely talked about is tonsil stones. Never heard of them? You’re not alone. Whenever I mention tonsil stones people usually look back with a blank stare. The more research I do, the more it seems these smelly stones are fairly commonplace, but many people don’t even know they exist.

What are tonsil stones?

Tonsil Stones (tonsilloliths) are lumps of calcified material that form in the tonsils. Tonsil stones weigh between 0.3g and 42g. They are created when the nooks and crannies in the tonsils trap debris including bacteria, dead cells and mucus. This debris then forms white blobs which get clogged in the tonsils and cause bad breath. They are more common in children and people who have suffered chronic inflammation in their tonsils or have had repeated bouts of tonsil stones.

How can I treat tonsil stones naturally?

Unfortunately, sometimes due to size and location, surgery or medical intervention are necessary. However, in many cases tonsils stones can be removed at home and measures can be taken to help avoid their return.

~Q-tip removal: You can remove many tonsil stones using cotton swabs at home. Wet both ends of the Q-tip to be sure it will be gentle and not irritate the tonsil. Then, using a flashlight, you can use the cotton swab to press against the tonsil near the crater holding the tonsil stone. This should dislodge the stone, allowing you to spit it out or wipe it out with the cotton swab. Be sure to gargle and spit immediately after to remove any remaining bacteria.

~Salt water gargle: Salt water is a simple yet effective way to reduce bacteria and mucous in the throat and help avoid tonsil stones. A daily gargle with warm salt water will help flush out the debris that can become lodged and form tonsil stones.

~Lemon or lime juice gargle: These citrus juices are high in vitamin c which is very effective in treating/removing tonsil stones. Mix 3 TBSP of juice with warm water, gargle and spit to help eliminate debris.

~Raw garlic or onions: Both of these are natural antibiotics. Eating them raw can help to significantly reduce the amount of bacteria in the tonsils, keeping tonsil stones at bay. Eating a raw clove of garlic or some onion a couple times a day will keep the bacteria away!

~Good oral hygiene: Properly brushing teeth twice a day and flossing once a day is important in managing the bacteria levels in your mouth. If you’re not taking care of your oral health, you will be more prone to cavities, other dental issues and tonsil stones.

As with any condition, prevention is always preferred over treating! Eating a health balanced diet low in processed or fried foods, taking care of your oral health and using the above techniques can help avoid tonsil stones or at least treat them naturally.

DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.