Finding YOUR Specific Arch Type & How it Affects Your Health

Your arch type affects the way your foot functions. It affects not just your feet, but also your knees, your back and more. In order to properly support your feet, it is important to know your arch type, so you can be sure you are using the proper footwear and orthotics to prevent pain or injury over time. By giving your feet the specific support they need to function optimally, you can improve other imbalances throughout your body as well.

 low

LOW ARCH (FLAT FEET)  

Approximately 20% of the population has low arches. Low arches are more flexible and tend to roll inwards and over-pronate.  Typically, imprints or iStep scans for your foot type show almost your entire foot. Low arches are often biomechanically imbalanced and can make your feet more susceptible to common foot problems such as heel pain, arch pain and plantar fasciitis.

The good news is that the right footwear and foot orthotics can help you achieve proper body alignment, prevent injuries and maintain a healthy and active lifestyle.

 mid

MEDIUM ARCH

Approximately 60% of the population has medium arches. Medium arches are often biomechanically efficient but still can be susceptible to common foot problems such as heel pain or ball-of-foot discomfort.  Typically, imprints or iStep scans for your foot type show approximately half your arch area with a well-defined forefoot and rearfoot.

Your feet are always on the go and will greatly benefit from some extra cushioning, shock absorption and support.  The right footwear and foot orthotics can help you achieve proper body alignment, prevent injuries and maintain a healthy and active lifestyle.

 high

HIGH ARCH

Approximately 20% of the population has high arches. High arches are usually classified as supinated and are more rigid than other feet. Typically, imprints or iStep scans for your foot type show mostly your heel and ball-of-foot, with very little in the arch area.

When we walk or run, our feet absorb most of the impact and shock.  With high arches you have less surface area for absorbing impact and you place excessive pressure on your rearfoot and forefoot areas.  This can make you susceptible to foot conditions such as heel pain, ball-of-foot pain or plantar fasciitis.

The good news is that the right orthotics can help fill in your arch cavity to disperse the shock, and provide the cushioning and alignment needed for you to prevent injuries and maintain a healthy and active lifestyle.

To find the orthotics that are right for your specific arch type and lifestyle, click here.

To find an iStep dealer and get your FREE personalized foot scan, that will help you identify your arch type and the appropriate products to coordinate, click here.

DISCLAIMER:  THE INFORMATION CONTAINED ON THIS SITE IS NOT PROVIDED BY MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS AND IS PROVIDED FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY.  THE INFORMATION ON THIS SITE IS NOT MEANT TO SUBSTITUTE CONSULTING WITH YOUR PODIATRIST, DOCTOR OR OTHER HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONAL. THE INFORMATION AVAILABLE ON OR THROUGH THIS SITE IS IN NO WAY INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, INFLUENCE TREATMENT OR CURE ANY FOOT OR OTHER HEALTH PROBLEMS NOR IS IT A SUBSTITUTE FOR THE SERVICES OR ADVICE OF A PODIATRIST, PHYSICIAN, OR HEALTH PROFESSIONAL.  YOU SHOULD ALWAYS CONSULT A PHYSICIAN LICENSED IN YOUR STATE IN ALL MATTERS RELATING TO YOUR HEALTH.

Do You Have Morton’s Neuroma?

Morton’s Neuroma is a common foot problem associated with pain, swelling and/or an inflammation of a nerve, usually at the ball-of-the-foot between the 3rd and 4th toes. Symptoms of this condition include sharp pain, burning, and even a lack of feeling in the affected area. Morton’s Neuroma may also cause numbness, tingling, or cramping in the forefoot.

Morton’s Neuroma is a foot condition caused from an abnormal function of the foot that leads to bones squeezing a nerve usually between the 3rd and 4th metatarsal heads. Symptoms of Morton’s Neuroma often occur during or after you have been placing significant pressure on the forefoot area, while walking, standing, jumping, or sprinting. This condition can also be caused by footwear selection. Footwear with pointed toes and/or high heels can often lead to a neuroma. Constricting shoes can pinch the nerve between the toes, causing discomfort and extreme pain.

The first step in treating Morton’s Neuroma is to select proper footwear. Footwear with a high and wide toe box (toe area) is ideal for treating and relieving the pain. The next step in treatment is to use an orthotic designed with a metatarsal pad. This pad is located behind the ball-of-the-foot to unload pressure, and relieve the pain caused by the neuroma.

mens-slipon

Buy Men’s Casual Slip-ons with high toe-boxes: Here

cork-slipon

Buy Women’s Slip-ons with high toe-boxes: Here

Mens-Lynco

Buy Lynco Men’s orthotics: Here

Womens-Lynco

Buy Lynco Women’s orthotics: Here

DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.

How To Wear Heels Pain-Free

As most of us women know, sometimes flats just won’t cut it. When you want to look and feel sexy, heels are where it’s at. So what’s a girl to do when torn between feeling comfortable and torturing herself in a sexy pair of heels? There are a few tricks you can apply to help keep your feet feeling happy.

  1. Thicker heels are better. You can still be sexy without a stiletto. Of course there will be times when an outfit just requires a thinner heel, but for everyday use, try to go with a bit more support. The thicker the heel of the shoe, the more support it will offer your body and the less wobbling you will do.
  2. Take your shoes off intermittently throughout the day to give your feet a break. If you have some down time under your desk, kick your shoes off and let your feet stretch out and get some air. Keeping your feet crammed into heels all day is usually a recipe for achey feet. Flex your toes up and down and rotate side to side to stretch the calves, arches and achilles tendons.
  3. Thicker platforms under the ball of your foot are better. They give you more cushioning under your feet so you have less pressure on your metatarsals. Look for shoes that have a rubber or PU base because they will offer more cushion than some of the harder materials like wood or plastic.
  4. Shoes with more coverage on the foot offer more support. The strappier the shoe, the more discomfort you will feel. In the cooler months, opt for boots that will hug and support the foot. In warmer months, opt for platforms, wedges and sandals with thicker straps (preferably also with an ankle strap for added support). To find comfortable shoes that look and feel amazing on your feet, check out: http://aetrex.com/women/heels-wedges
  5. Use an orthotic or foot pad to add cushioning and support to your shoe. Aetrex’s Lynco Women’s Fashion Orthotics help provide much needed comfort and support for your favorite fashion footwear. These innovative orthotics are flexible, ultra light-weight and designed for support and pressure relief. The unique Cobra shape and built-in Lynco support comfortably balances your feet and helps provide proper body alignment. Made from soft, breathable full grain leathers and state-of-the-art thermoplastic urethanes. You can purchase them here: http://aetrex.com/women/lynco-orthotics-womens/lynco-fashion-series
  6. Be sure you are wearing the right size shoes! You would be surprised to find out how many people wear shoes that are the wrong size. Be sure to get your feet measured by a professional. You can also visit a location that uses iStep foot scanning technology for a total foot evaluation. The Step will identify your arch type, foot size and pressure points. It will then recommend the appropriate orthotics for your particular needs. With the right orthotic style and in combination with the proper footwear, you can prevent unnecessary foot pain and achieve maximum foot comfort to help you maintain a healthy lifestyle. In a matter of  seconds you’ll be on your way to a better life. You can find your local iStep location here: http://aetrex.com/store-locator/

By treating your feet right, making sure your shoes fit and ensuring you get breaks throughout the day, it is possible to wear heels pain-free!

DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.

Managing Arch Pain

The term arch pain (often referred to as arch strain) refers to an inflammation and/or burning sensation at the arch of the foot.

Cause

There are many different factors that can cause arch pain. A structural imbalance or an injury to the foot can often be the direct cause. However, most frequently the cause is a common condition called plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a broad band of fibrous tissue located along the bottom surface of the foot that runs from the heel to the forefoot. Excessive stretching of the plantar fascia, usually due to over-pronation (flat feet), causes plantar fasciitis. The inflammation caused by the plantar fascia being stretched away from the heel often leads to pain in the heel and arch areas. The pain is often extreme in the morning when an individual first gets out of bed or after a prolonged period of rest. If this condition is left untreated and strain on the longitudinal arch continues, a bony protrusion may develop, known as a heel spur. It is important to treat the condition promptly before it worsens.

Treatment & Prevention

This is a common foot condition that can be easily treated. If you suffer from arch pain avoid high-heeled shoes whenever possible. Try to choose footwear with a reasonable heel, soft leather uppers, shock absorbing soles and removable foot insoles. When the arch pain is pronation related (flat feet), an orthotic designed with a medial heel post and proper arch support is recommended for treating the pain. This type of orthotic will control over-pronation, support the arch and provide the necessary relief.

mens-slipon

Buy Men’s Casual Slip-ons with removable insoles: Here

cork-slipon

Buy Women’s Slip-ons with high cushioned insoles: Here

Mens-Lynco

Buy Lynco Men’s orthotics: Here

Womens-Lynco

Buy Lynco Women’s orthotics: Here

DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.

Are Tight Calves Causing Your Foot Pain?

One of the things I am learning in my journey to my best health possible is that what you think may be causing you symptoms (i.e. foot pain) may stem from a totally different area of the body. Often, when we experience heel and/or foot pain, it is stemming from tightness of our calf muscles, a condition called Gastrocnemius Equinus (GE).

calves

The gastrocnemius muscle is a big calf muscle. Any exercise in which you raise your heels, putting weight on the ball of your foot, makes the muscle bigger and stronger and gives the leg a nicely toned and defined muscle (which is why many women love how their legs look when wearing high heels). The top of the muscle is attached to your femur, and the bottom of the muscle forms part of the Achilles tendon which attaches on the bone at the back of your foot.  The Achilles tendon is composed of two parts: the soleus, which is found only deep and behind the calf muscle and is almost never a problem, and the more superficial and bigger gastrocnemius muscle which is frequently a cause of pain and symptoms.

When you walk the gastrocnemius muscle contracts and lifts your heel off the ground which moves you forward. For many of us, this muscle is short or tight which can lead to problems including flat feet, bunions, metatarsalgia, hammertoes, sesamoiditis, plantar fasciitis (heel pain) and Achilles tendon inflammation, tendinitis, and even Achilles tendon rupture.

wall-stretch

The most effective way to treat GE is with a regular stretching routine, particularly the wall stretch. Stand facing a wall with both feet together. Place your hands at shoulder height and width on the wall in front of you. Take a step forward with your right foot so that it is now only a few inches from the wall. Shift your weight onto your right leg and bend at the knee. Keeping both heels on the ground, lean your upper body slowly toward the wall until you feel a good stretch happening along the calf muscles of your left leg. Hold the stretch for 30 seconds. Return to your original position with both feet together. Repeat the stretch, this time putting your left leg forward. Do this exercise three times on each foot.

DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.

Home Remedies for Foot Tendonitis Pain

This week I am trying a new video format on the blog. Check out this week’s video to learn more about home remedies for foot tendonitis (inflammation or pain in the foot caused by overuse or injury). These are common items which you likely already have around the house that can do wonders for helping to reduce your foot pain. Be sure to comment to let me know what you think of the new video format!

To watch the video click here: Foot Tendonitis Natural Remedies