Why Am I So Tired?

One of the many reasons people reach out to me is that they are feeling low on energy. It’s very challenging to keep up with our busy lifestyles when we are feeling sluggish and unmotivated. I have put together ten simple tips to help you boost your energy naturally. Making small changes over time can lead to big results!

  • Reduce or eliminate caffeine.
  • The ups and downs of caffeine include dehydration and blood sugar ups and downs, making mood swings more frequent.
  • Drink water.
  • Most Americans are chronically dehydrated. Before you go to sugar or caffeine, have a glass of water and wait a few minutes to see what happens.
  • Caution: Soft drinks are now America’s number one source of added sugar.
  • Eat dark leafy green vegetables.
  • Green is associated with spring, the time of renewal and refreshing, and vital energy.
  • Greens are full of vitamins and nutrients and great for improving circulation, lifting the spirit, purifying the blood, and strengthening the immune system.
  • Broccoli, collards, bok choy, kale, mustard greens, broccoli rabe, arugula, and dandelion greens are some of the many greens to choose from.
  • Use gentle sweets.
  • Avoid sugar and chemical artificial sweeteners.
  • Use gentle sweeteners like maple syrup, brown rice syrup, agave nectar, and stevia.
  • Eat sweet vegetables such as yams, carrots, and beets.
  • Get physical activity.
  • Start with simple activities, like walking or yoga – start with 10 minutes a day and increase.
  • Get more sleep and rest and relaxation.
  • When you are tired or stressed, your body will crave energy.
  • These cravings are often a result of being sleep-deprived, going to bed late, and waking up early for months and years on end.
  • Evaluate the amount of animal food you eat.
  • Eating too much meat, dairy, chicken, and eggs can lead to low energy. So can eating too little! Experiment. Respect your body’s individuality.
  • Take time for yourself.
  • Find activities that restore your energy, such as a walk, a bath, a museum, a movie, or whatever you enjoy and schedule a weekly date with yourself to do these things!
  • Get in touch with your spirituality.
  • We are spiritual beings in a physical world.
  • Find ways to get in touch with your spiritual side, be it meditating, dancing, drawing, going to church or temple, or being in nature.
  • Get rid of relationships that drain you.
  • People can drain you of your energy. It doesn’t mean that they are bad, but it is good to notice who drains you and why.
  • See if you can transform those relationships by communicating and setting boundaries or end the relationship.

Treat your body, mind and soul right, listen to your body’s cues and you will see a big difference in your energy levels!

DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.

Could It Be Adrenal Fatigue?

Daily living causes much stress, which is not easy on the adrenal glands. Because of the high-stress society we live in, many of us are unknowingly suffering from adrenal fatigue. As we approach the holiday season, stress increases significantly for many of us.

The adrenal glands (also known as suprarenal glands) are the triangle-shaped endocrine glands that sit atop the kidneys. They are chiefly responsible for regulating the stress response through the synthesis of corticosteroids and catecholamine, including cortisol and adrenaline.

When the adrenals are tired, the body may experience a number of different symptoms.

The most common symptoms caused by tired or worn-out adrenal glands are:

  • Excessive sweating or perspiration from little activity
  • Excessive sweating or perspiration from little activity
  • Lower back pain and/or knee weakness or pain, especially on the side
  • Dark circles under the eyes
  • Dizziness
  • Muscle twitches
  • Low blood sugar
  • Heart palpitations
  • Sensitivity to light, or difficulty seeing at night
  • Cravings for salt
  • Low stamina for stress, and easily irritated
  • Excessive mood responses after eating carbohydrates such as pasta, breads and sugar
  • Chronic infections (bacterial, viral, fungal, yeast)
  • Low blood pressure
  • Light-headedness upon standing up
  • Tired but wired feeling, poor sleep
  • Cravings for sweets and carbs, intolerance to alcohol
  • Premature aging
  • Dry, unhealthy skin with excess pigmentation
  • Lack of libido
  • Cystic breasts
  • Tendency to startle easily
  • Negative response to thyroid hormone

If you suspect you might have tired adrenals, address it right away. Adrenal glands are extremely important to a healthy immune system. They are necessary for proper thyroid function.

Natural Ways to Support Your Adrenals

  • Get some sleep. You must rest if you are going to help your adrenals get stronger. That means going to bed every night by 10 p.m. Make this a priority and stick with it. Your adrenals need their beauty sleep!
  • Eliminate sugar and processed carbs. Sugar and simple carbs (junk!) put stress on the adrenals. Adrenal glands help to regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Eat clean animal protein foods, organic vegetables, fruits, nuts, legumes, beans and grains.
  • Quit the coffee habit and drink plenty of fresh filtered water every day.

“What is Adrenal Fatigue?” www.adrenalfatigue.org

“Are You Tired and Wired?: Your Proven 30 Day Plan for Overcoming Adrenal Fatigue and Feeling Fantastic Again.” Marcelle Pick. 2011

DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.

Sleep Better And Reduce Stress With This Herb

Valerian Root is a fabulous and powerful herb that has many great health benefits. I have recommended this herb to many clients and have been thrilled with the changes they see when incorporating valerian root into their health routines. So what are some of the benefits, you may ask?

  1. Better sleep
    • Valerian root, taken over time, may have a cumulative effect on improving sleep. Be sure to try taking for at least 30 days to determine if it is effective for you.
    • If using valerian for insomnia issues, take your capsules about 1-2 hours before bedtime for maximum efficacy
  2. Aids in healthy digestion
    • Valerian has been used to help prevent stomach spasms, colic, cramps, bloating and diarrhea
  3. Reduced anxiety
    • If using valerian for reducing anxiety, you can take your recommended doe about 3 times per day, spaced out throughout the day
  4. Calming/Natural sedative
    • Valerian’s ability to promote relaxation and better sleep makes it a natural choice for those who require additional support to help relax or calm themselves
  5. Improve focus/reduce hyperactivity in children
    • Because of its naturally calming effects, valerian can be an effective and natural alternative for children who suffer from hyperactivity.

Here are a few reliable brands of organic valerian root:

As with any herbal supplement, it is always best to check with your herbalist or medical practitioner before beginning a regimen. However, when taken properly and consistently, valerian can really have some wonderfully positive effects on your health!

DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.

You Need Magnesium And You’re Not Getting Enough

Magnesium is one of the six essential minerals that comprise 99% of the body’s mineral content. Magnesium helps build bones, supports nerve function, and is essential to converting food to energy.

Magnesium has been shown to to help with conditions such as headaches, chronic pain, asthma, anxiety, muscle tension and sleep disorders. Unfortunately, most Americans are seriously lacking magnesium. Magnesium deficiency, especially prevalent in older populations, is linked to insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, coronary heart disease, and osteoporosis.

According the Medical News Today, “The Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) for magnesium depends on age and gender. The National Institutes of Health recommend that children 1-3 years of age get 80 milligrams of magnesium a day, rising to 130 milligrams for children aged 4-8, and 240 milligrams for children aged 9-13. After the age of 14, RDAs diverge for men and women, with men typically requiring more magnesium than women due to a larger average body mass. At the age of 14-18, the RDA for males is 410 milligrams, and 360 milligrams for females. Adult females are advised to get 310-320 milligrams per day. An RDA of 350-400 milligrams is advised during pregnancy, and 310-360 milligrams when breastfeeding. The RDA of magnesium for adult males is 400-420 milligrams.”

So what are some ways you can improve your magnesium intake?

Magnesium Rich Foods

Whenever possible, it’s always best to obtain your vitamins and minerals naturally from a food source. Some foods you can incorporate into your diet that are high in magnesium include: sunflower seeds, almonds, sesame seeds, spinach, cashews, black beans, oatmeal, broccoli, peanut butter, shrimp, brown rice, kidney beans and bananas.

Magnesium Supplements

According to DrAxe.com, “It’s believed that magnesium in citrate, chelate and chloride forms are absorbed better than magnesium supplements in oxide and magnesium sulfate form. Here’s a bit about the different types of magnesium supplements that you’ll likely come across:

  • Magnesium Chelate – highly absorbable by the body and the kind found in foods naturally. This type is bound to multiple amino acids (proteins) and used to restore magnesium levels.
  • Magnesium Citrate – magnesium combined with citric acid. This may have a laxative effect in some cases when taken in high doses, but is otherwise safe to use for improving digestion and preventing constipation.
  • Magnesium Chloride Oil – an oil form of magnesium that can be applied to skin. It’s also given to people who have digestive disorders that prevent normal absorption of magnesium from their food. Athletes sometimes use magnesium oil to increase energy and endurance, to dull muscle pain, and to heal wounds or skin irritation.
  • Magnesium Glycinate – highly absorbable, this is recommended for anyone with a known magnesium deficiency and less likely to cause laxative effects than some other magnesium supplements.
  • Magnesium Threonate – has a high level of absorbability since it can penetrate the mitochondrial membrane. This type is not as readily available, but as more research is conducted, it may become more widely used.”

So if you feel you have been suffering from any of the above conditions or you could benefit from increasing your magnesium intake, consider supplementing or incorporating more magnesium rich foods into your diet.

DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.