How Your Food Affects Your Energy

Traditional Chinese Medicine focuses on using foods to prevent and treat disease. Knowledge of food energetics can help one build a stronger sense of health and well-being by eating different foods that impose different effects[1]. Like the saying, “you are what you eat.”

The principles of macrobiotics involve creating a yin and yang balance in all aspects of life – including the food combinations we choose to eat.

Eating from your own garden or buying your produce from the local farmers’ market will leave you feeling more connected to your home or local community. When you eat seasonal, locally grown produce, the body is more able to maintain balance from the inside out.

It is beneficial to take advantage of cooling fruits and lighter greens in the summertime, when they are at their peak in harvest. At the same time, heartier vegetables, such as deeply rooted carrots and squashes, grow more abundantly in the wintertime, and are going to add warmth to the body. It’s good to maintain a balance of eating seasonally as well as locally, as much as possible, to stay in harmony with the natural order of things.

   Quality Food Preparation
Grounded

Relaxed

Root vegetables

Sweet vegetables

Meat, fish

Beans

Stewing

Pressure Cooking

Baking

Light

Creative

Flexible

Leafy greens

Wheat, barley, quinoa

Fruit

Raw foods

Chocolate

Boiling

Steaming

Gas stove cooking

Tense

Anxious

Sugar

Caffeine

Alcohol

Microwave cooking

Electric stove cooking

Factory farming

Connected

Harmonious

Organic foods

Whole foods

Local foods

Brown rice

Home cooking

Home gardening

© Integrative Nutrition, Inc. | Reprinted with permission

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[1] Leggett, Daverick. “The Energetics of Food.” Journal of Chinese Medicine. 56 (1998): n. page. Print.