How To Eat Gluten Free

Gluten is the protein found in wheat (durum, emmer, spelt, farina, farro, KAMUT® khorasan wheat and einkorn), rye, barley and triticale. Gluten helps foods maintain their shape, acting as a glue that holds food together. Gluten has gotten a bad reputation lately because it can be difficult for many people to digest. If you have been toying with the idea of going gluten free, here are a few pointers.

Here is a list of gluten-free foods to enjoy:

  • Potatoes
  • Buckwheat
  • Oats (*must be labeled gluten-free to avoid cross-contamination)
  • Corn/ maize
  • Rice
  • Quinoa
  • Amaranth
  • Teff
  • Millet
  • Beans
  • Nuts and nut butters
  • Eggs
  • Fresh fruit
  • Fresh vegetables
  • Herbs and spices
  • Meats and fish purchased without sauce or seasonings
  • Home-made soups (avoid bouillon cubes, barley malt, and all types of pasta)
  • Juice (all-natural, 100% fruit juice)

Foods to avoid when going gluten free:

  • Wheat
  • Kamut
  • Spelt
  • Rye
  • Barley
  • Oats are generally avoided because they are almost always processed in mills that process grains containing gluten
  • Modified food starch
  • Barley enzymes (found in majority of breakfast cereals), soy sauce, and distilled vinegar (malt vinegar)

If you are going 100% gluten free due to an allergy or celiac diagnosis, be mindful of cross-contamination. Be sure to have dedicated gluten free food prep areas and be sure to thoroughly clean appliances like toasters that may contain crumbs from products containing gluten.

DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.