Amazing Health Benefits of Pumpkin!!!

One of my favorite things about Fall is the arrival of pumpkin EVERYTHING season! I love the cool weather combined with warming, nourishing and not to mention delicious pumpkin! Eating seasonally is a great way to prepare your body for the change in weather.

Pumpkins also have many great health benefits, including:

-Pumpkin is an antioxidant/anti inflammatory food so it supports joint health, organ health, stress relief and some injuries.

-Pumpkins are high in vitamin C and zinc so they help boost your immunity.

-Pumpkins are high in vitamin A so they help protect your eyes from cataracts and degeneration.

-Pumpkins are high in magnesium which is great for bone and tooth health.

-Pumpkins contain L tryptophan which can help naturally fight depression.

So this fall, enjoy some pumpkin! Add it to your chili, your smoothies, your oatmeal, pie and more!

DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.

Health Benefits of Whey Before Bedtime

One of the issues most of my clients struggle with when they first come to me is after-dinner snacking. They feel like they need a little “something” in those few hours between dinner and bedtime. One of the strategies I find most effective for my clients is using whey protein just before bed to help them boost metabolism, burn some fat and feel satiated. So what are some of the health benefits you can expect from incorporating whey protein into your bedtime routine?

  • Burn fat while you sleep: Whey protein provides a boost of amino acids which help increase your metabolism, allowing your body to burn additional calories while sleeping.
  • Improves post-workout muscle recovery: When you workout, you are tearing down your muscles to build them up. Whey protein allows your muscles to recover faster, especially when sleeping. Giving your body that boost just before bed helps tremendously with recovery and reducing muscle soreness. You ensure that your muscles are getting the protein they need to rebuild after a workout.
  • Improved sleep & waking up refreshed: Adding in amino acids and burning calories in your sleep helps you wake up feeling refreshed and energized in the morning.

There is a small minority that may have difficulty sleeping when taking whey protein just before bed (for some, an increase in metabolism may cause an increase in energy). If this is the case, you can try mixing it with magnesium powder or using magnesium lotion to help support natural sleep.

Please be sure that you are using a whey supplement that is low in calorie and sugar, it should really just be whey without any added ingredients. You’re looking for a supplement, not a small meal. Some suggested products include:

Whey Protein Supplement

Improved sleep with magnesium:

DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.

Quick & Easy Stretches For Heel Pain

There are two different categories of heel pain. The first is caused by over-use repetitive stress which refers to a soreness resulting from too much impact on a specific area of the foot. This condition, often referred to as “heel pain syndrome,” can be caused by shoes with heels that are too low, a thinned out fat pad in the heel area, or from a sudden increase in activity. Plantar fasciitis, a very common diagnosis of heel pain, is usually caused from a biomechancial problem, such as over-pronation (flat feet). The plantar fascia is a broad band of fibrous tissue that runs along the bottom surface of the foot, from the heel through the midfoot and into the forefoot. Over-pronation can cause the plantar fascia to be excessively stretched and inflamed, resulting in pain in the heel and arch areas of the foot. Often the pain will be most intense first thing in the morning or after a prolonged period of rest. The pain will gradually subside as the day progresses.

There are a few quick and easy stretches you can do at home to help prevent and treat heel pain.

staircase-stretch

Stair Case Stretch: Stand on a step with your feet together. The toes and balls of your feet should be on the step but your heels should overhang the step. Be sure you are supporting yourself with one hand on a railing or wall. Slowly lift up and down on your toes ten times. Repeat three sets of ten lifts. This exercise helps to strengthen your feet and heels, preventing and healing Plantar Fasciitis.

wall-stretch

The Wall Stretch: Stand facing a wall with both feet together. Place your hands at shoulder height and width on the wall in front of you. Take a step forward with your right foot so that it is now only a few inches from the wall. Shift your weight onto your right leg and bend at the knee. Keeping both heels on the ground, lean your upper body slowly toward the wall until you feel a good stretch happening along the calf muscles of your left leg. Hold the stretch for 30 seconds. Return to your original position with both feet together. Repeat the stretch, this time putting your left leg forward. Do this exercise three times on each foot.

toe-wall-stretch

Toe To Wall Stretch: To begin this stretch, the heel should be on the ground and the toes on the wall. Place the opposite foot behind you. Keep the legs straight and move the entire body forward. Do not move your upper body forward and stick your backside out. You should feel a very strong stretch in the back of the calf and some stretch in the arch. To increase the stretch, move your heel closer to the wall and increase the angle of your foot. To decrease the stretch, move your heel back and lower your toes. Hold for 60 seconds and repeat 3 times.

To properly treat heel pain, you must absorb shock, provide cushioning and elevate the heel to transfer pressure. This can be accomplished with a heel cup, visco heel cradle, or an orthotic designed with materials that will absorb shock and shear forces. When the condition is pronation related (usually plantar fasciitis), an orthotic with medial posting and good arch support will control the pronation and prevent the inflammation of the plantar fascia. Footwear selection is also an important criteria when treating heel pain. Shoes with a firm heel counter, good arch support, and appropriate heel height are the ideal choice.

DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.

Why You Should Throw Out Your Rubber Flip Flops!

For many, flip-flops are a warm weather essential. Did you know that flip flops can be seriously damaging to your feet? Flip-flops are fine if you plan to slip them on for a quick trip to the store, but they should not be worn for extended periods of time.

Because of the design of standard rubber flip-flops, your toes have to grip extra hard to keep them on your feet. The overuse of these muscles over time can cause inflammation of the tendons in your feet. Flip-flops can also cause hammertoes and create or worsen bunions.

Lack of cushioning in most rubber flip-flops can also lead to stress fractures over time. The foot needs some support to cushion the bones under the weight of your body as it is in motion. Standard flip-flops don’t offer any cushioning or arch support.

The lack of support in a flip-flop changes your entire gait (the way you walk). This affects your posture as well as cause pain in your ankles, knees, hips and back.

While cheap flip-flops can be a cute and inexpensive accessory to throw on poolside, try not to make them an everyday staple. Opt for sandals or flip flops with better cushioning and arch support like the ones below. Your entire body will thank you!

flips-pronation

As you can see in the image above, Lynco Flips help to properly position the foot and ankle to align the body and prevent over pronation. In comparison, the leather and rubber flip flops offer little to no support, allowing the ankle to roll inward, causing misalignment.

pink-flips

To learn more about Lynco Flips or purchase them, click here for women’s or here for men’s.

DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.

Easy Healthy Homemade Chocolate Chip Ice Cream

I LOVE ICE CREAM! There…I said it! Who doesn’t??? However, I don’t love what it does to my waistline. This recipe is paleo friendly and very easy to make at home in your high-powered blender and ice cream maker.

Ingredients:

  • 1 can full fat coconut cream
  • 1/4 cup almond butter
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/4 cup honey or maple syrup
  • 1/4 cup Enjoy Life mini chocolate chips

Instructions:

  1. Place all ingredients into a high powered blender (like Vitamix or Blendtec).
  2. Blend on high for 30 seconds until smooth (no clumps). Mix in chocolate chips after blending is complete.
  3. Turn on your ice cream maker.
  4. Pour the mixture into the ice cream maker while it’s moving and let it churn for 20-25 minutes until firm or is stops churning.
  5. Transfer to a freezer-friendly container (air-tight) and freeze for at least 1 hour, or until completely frozen.
  6. ENJOY!

Preventing Sandal Blisters

OK, so here is the thing. If your shoes are good quality, and they fit properly they should NOT cause any blisters on your feet. That being said, I know a lot of us find that super cute pair of sandals or heels that we just “have” to squeeze our feet into even though we know it may end badly. When that happens, there are a few tricks of the trade you can use the help prevent blisters.

  • Wear socks with your sandals around the house for a few days. This helps to stretch out your sandals without the friction and irritation on bare feet.
  • Apply clear deodorant to the places your foot may become irritated. It can help to form a protective barrier on your foot.
  • Squeaky Cheeks: Prevents blisters, rashes, and chafing in a dry, clean-feeling powder. I like that it uses natural ingredients like bentonite clay and corn starch rather than talcum powder which has been shown to have some negative affects on health. Helps to absorb sweat and odor without staining shoes.
  • Strappy Strips: Thin, performance-material strips that easily adhere to straps and pinching sling-backs to prevent blisters and increase comfort. They stop shoes from slipping and prevent angry red marks across your feet.
  • Blister Balm: Apply before putting on your shoes to create a protective barrier. Helps moisturize skin and prevent irritation and inflammation. Keeps pores clog-free so sweat can escape and the skin can “breathe.”
  • Blister Elixir: Prevents blisters and irritation, even from new shoes. Creates a barrier to protect your skin from chafing. Lasts up to 8 hours.

The best way to avoid blisters is to buy sandals that FIT properly. To shop women’s sandals that are designed with BOTH fashion and comfort in mind, check out Aetrex women’s sandals and Aetrex men’s sandals. I also highly recommend getting an iStep scan to be sure you are wearing the proper size and type of footwear for YOUR specific footwear needs.

DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.

 

Finding YOUR Specific Arch Type & How it Affects Your Health

Your arch type affects the way your foot functions. It affects not just your feet, but also your knees, your back and more. In order to properly support your feet, it is important to know your arch type, so you can be sure you are using the proper footwear and orthotics to prevent pain or injury over time. By giving your feet the specific support they need to function optimally, you can improve other imbalances throughout your body as well.

 low

LOW ARCH (FLAT FEET)  

Approximately 20% of the population has low arches. Low arches are more flexible and tend to roll inwards and over-pronate.  Typically, imprints or iStep scans for your foot type show almost your entire foot. Low arches are often biomechanically imbalanced and can make your feet more susceptible to common foot problems such as heel pain, arch pain and plantar fasciitis.

The good news is that the right footwear and foot orthotics can help you achieve proper body alignment, prevent injuries and maintain a healthy and active lifestyle.

 mid

MEDIUM ARCH

Approximately 60% of the population has medium arches. Medium arches are often biomechanically efficient but still can be susceptible to common foot problems such as heel pain or ball-of-foot discomfort.  Typically, imprints or iStep scans for your foot type show approximately half your arch area with a well-defined forefoot and rearfoot.

Your feet are always on the go and will greatly benefit from some extra cushioning, shock absorption and support.  The right footwear and foot orthotics can help you achieve proper body alignment, prevent injuries and maintain a healthy and active lifestyle.

 high

HIGH ARCH

Approximately 20% of the population has high arches. High arches are usually classified as supinated and are more rigid than other feet. Typically, imprints or iStep scans for your foot type show mostly your heel and ball-of-foot, with very little in the arch area.

When we walk or run, our feet absorb most of the impact and shock.  With high arches you have less surface area for absorbing impact and you place excessive pressure on your rearfoot and forefoot areas.  This can make you susceptible to foot conditions such as heel pain, ball-of-foot pain or plantar fasciitis.

The good news is that the right orthotics can help fill in your arch cavity to disperse the shock, and provide the cushioning and alignment needed for you to prevent injuries and maintain a healthy and active lifestyle.

To find the orthotics that are right for your specific arch type and lifestyle, click here.

To find an iStep dealer and get your FREE personalized foot scan, that will help you identify your arch type and the appropriate products to coordinate, click here.

DISCLAIMER:  THE INFORMATION CONTAINED ON THIS SITE IS NOT PROVIDED BY MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS AND IS PROVIDED FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY.  THE INFORMATION ON THIS SITE IS NOT MEANT TO SUBSTITUTE CONSULTING WITH YOUR PODIATRIST, DOCTOR OR OTHER HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONAL. THE INFORMATION AVAILABLE ON OR THROUGH THIS SITE IS IN NO WAY INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, INFLUENCE TREATMENT OR CURE ANY FOOT OR OTHER HEALTH PROBLEMS NOR IS IT A SUBSTITUTE FOR THE SERVICES OR ADVICE OF A PODIATRIST, PHYSICIAN, OR HEALTH PROFESSIONAL.  YOU SHOULD ALWAYS CONSULT A PHYSICIAN LICENSED IN YOUR STATE IN ALL MATTERS RELATING TO YOUR HEALTH.

Shrimp Lime Salad With A Zing!

This shrimp salad is a PERFECT summer side dish. It’s a huge hit at BBQ’s and parties. I always love a refreshing salad on a hot day!

INGREDIENTS:

1/4 cup chopped red onion
1 tsp olive oil
2 limes, juiced

1/4 tsp kosher or pink himalayan salt, with 
black pepper to taste
1 lb jumbo cooked, peeled shrimp, chopped
1 medium tomato, diced
1 medium ripe avocado, diced
1 jalapeno, seeds removed, diced fine
1 tbsp chopped cilantro


DIRECTIONS:

1) In a small bowl combine lime juice, onion, olive oil, salt and pepper. Marinate at least 5 minutes.

2) In a larger bowl combine chopped shrimp, avocado, tomato, jalapeño.

3) Combine all the ingredients together in large bowl, add cilantro and gently toss. Adjust salt and pepper to taste.

Is it Normal That My Second Toe is Longer Than My Big Toe?

When I was in college, I remember having a discussion about toe lengths with my roommates because both of them had second toes that were longer than their big toes. They both insisted that I was in the minority because their toes were both the same. Of course, I decided I had to research this topic so we could determine who was right. Turns out, I was right! They have a condition called Morton’s Toe. Morton’s Toe is a common forefoot disorder where the second toe is longer than the Big Toe (the Hallux).

Morton’s toe leads to excessive pressure on the second metatarsal head (behind the second toe at the ball-of-the-foot) resulting in pain similar to the discomfort associated with metatarsalgia. The constant pressure placed on the longer second toe while walking or standing can lead to callus formation under the second metatarsal head due to this excessive pressure.

Proper treatment of Morton’s Toe starts with selecting proper footwear. Footwear with a high and wide toe box (toe area) is ideal for treating this condition. It may be necessary to buy footwear a half size to a size larger to accommodate the longer second toe. Orthotics that feature arch support to keep the foot aligned, and a metatarsal pad to reduce stress on the ball-of-the-foot are often recommended when treating this condition. Proper footwear combined with a effective orthotic will provide relief from pain associated with Morton’s Toe.

mens-slipon

Buy Men’s Casual Slip-ons with high toe-boxes: Here

cork-slipon

Buy Women’s Slip-ons with high toe-boxes: Here

Mens-Lynco

Buy Lynco Men’s orthotics: Here

DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.

Do You Have Hammer Toe?

A hammer toe is a toe that is contracted at the PIP joint (middle joint in the toe), potentially leading to severe pressure and pain. Ligaments and tendons that have tightened cause the toe’s joints to curl downwards. Hammer toes may occur in any toe except the big toe. There is often discomfort at the top part of the toe due to rubbing against the shoe. Hammer toes are classified based on the mobility of the toe joints. There are two types – flexible and rigid. In a flexible hammer toe, the joint has the ability to move. This type of hammer toe can be straightened manually. A rigid hammer toe does not have that same ability to move. Movement is very limited and can be extremely painful. This sometimes causes foot movement to become restricted leading to extra stress at the ball-of-the-foot, and possibly causing pain and the development of corns and calluses. Follow this link to learn more about hammer toe products.

Hammer toes result from a muscle imbalance which causes the ligaments and tendons to become unnaturally tight. This results in the joint curling downward. Arthritis can also lead to many different forefoot deformities, including hammer toes.

Changing the type of footwear worn is a very important step in the treatment of hammer toes. When choosing a shoe, make sure the toe box (toe area) is high and broad, and can accommodate the hammer toes. A shoe with a high, broad toe box will provide enough room in the forefoot area so that there is less friction against the toes. Other conservative treatments include using forefoot products designed to relieve hammer toes, such as hammer toe crests and hammer toe splints. These devices will help hold down the hammer toe and provide relief to the forefoot. Gel toe shields and gel toe caps are also recommended to eliminate friction between the shoe and the toe, while providing comfort and lubrication.

mens-slipon

Buy Men’s Casual Slip-ons with high toe-boxes: Here

cork-slipon

Buy Women’s Slip-ons with high toe-boxes: Here

Mens-Lynco

Buy Lynco Men’s orthotics: Here

Womens-Lynco

Buy Lynco Women’s orthotics: Here

DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.