Do You Overpronate When You Walk or Run?

Normal walking can be divided into two phases: stance and swing. Stance is the time that your foot is in contact with the ground. This is when problems usually occur. Swing is the time the opposite, non weight bearing foot is in the air.

Diagnosing overpronation relies more on looking at how you walk or run than where your pain is located.

What is Overpronation?

Pronation is a normal part of walking or running. When the outside edge of your heel hits the ground, it supinates—or locks—to deal with the shockwave. Your foot then rolls in a bit and your heel moves outward. Together, these actions cause you to pronate—or unlock. Pronation helps you absorb shock and adapt to uneven surfaces.

But if your foot rolls too far inward, like many people, you overpronate.

Overpronation can cause problems throughout your body. Why? Because the foot isn’t properly absorbing the shock of your stride—instead passing that shock on to your legs, knees, hips, and even spine.

Overpronating also forces the inner toes to take on all the work of pushing off for your next step. That can lead to injury or other foot problems including plantar fasciitis, bunions and calluses.

People with flat feet, low arches, or overly flexible arches tend to overpronate. Because your arches can’t support your step, your foot rolls too far inward, twisting your foot, leg, and knee and forcing your body out of proper alignment.

Other factors that may contribute to overpronation include:

  • Injury.
  • Tendonitis.
  • Arthritis.
  • Weight increase.
  • Aging.
Think you might overpronate? Try this simple 3-part self-assessment quiz.

Question #1: Do I have:

  • Pain in my feet, legs, knees, hips, or back after walking or running?
  • Unusual tightness in my leg muscles?
  • Recurring problems with bunions or calluses?

If you answered “yes” to any of these, you show symptoms that may be caused by overpronation. Are you at a high risk for overpronating.

Question #2:  Do I have:

  • Flat feet or low arches?
  • Tendonitis?
  • Arthritis?

If you answered yes to any of these, it’s possible your symptoms stem from overpronating. Now, pull out a well-worn pair of your running or
walking shoes. Try this last self- assessment quiz.

Question #3: Do your shoes:

  • Show uneven, heavier wear on the inside edge of the sole (especially on the heel, midfoot, and the ball of the foot)?
  • Tilt inward when placed on a flat surface?

If you answered yes to either of these, you probably overpronate. Make an appointment with a podiatrist to confirm your condition.

The good news is Overpronation is quite common and very correctable. But left unchecked, it could cause:
  • Degenerative wear and tear and chronic discomfort in the knees, hips, or spine
  • Plantar fasciitis
  • Repetitive injuries
  • Stress fractures
  • Arthritis
How do I treat and prevent overpronation?

Overpronation may just be part of your natural gait. But you can correct it—and avoid the many associated effects—with some simple measures. Your podiatrist will help you determine the best steps for you. For general foot health it’s best to wear shoes with:

  1. Good arch support
  2. Firm midsoles
  3. Deep heel cups
  4. Low heels

Lastly, if you want to help prevent future stress on your feet be sure to see https://www.aetrex.com – recognized and approved by the American Podiatric Medical Association– for top style and comfort in footwear.

Source material excerpted from https://www.footsmart.com/health-resource-center/foot/pronation. See this link to learn more and full credit

Tips to Keep Feet Happy this Holiday Season

Holiday shopping, decorating, parties and traveling are all part of our holiday revelries. But while you’re making all that merriment, how happy are your feet?

You may be doing a lot of walking, dancing, standing and sitting in one position throughout the holiday season. Half of all Americans report experiencing foot pain at some point in their lives, according to a survey conducted by American Podiatric Medical Association. No one wants soreness or injuries to slow them down during the holidays, so it’s important to care for your feet so they can carry you through all those seasonal celebrations and chores.

Follow this advice to keep feet healthy (and happy) this holiday season:

  • Moisturize– Dry winter air and cold temperatures can take a toll on skin. Moisturize feet daily to help avoid dry, cracked and irritated skin.
  • Exercise your feet – Stretching is a good way to avoid muscle cramps. Stave off toe cramps by raising, pointing and curling your toes for five seconds. Repeat 10 times. Rotating your ankles can also help relax feet. Cup your heel and turn each ankle slowly five times to loosen ankle joints.
  • Massage – Foot rubs not only feel good, they’re a great way to release tension, boost circulation and refresh skin after a long day on your feet. Take a few minutes to massage your feet at the end of a day of shopping and celebrating. Use lotion and take care of moisturizing at the same time!
  • Pedicure properly – Picture-perfect toes are part of a great holiday wardrobe for many women. Whether you do it yourself or go to a salon, be sure your pedicure is done properly. Never use a razor to remove dead skin – opt for a good pumice stone instead. Don’t cut cuticles; push them back gently with a rubber tool made for this purpose. Use toenail clippers with a straight edge to cut nails straight across.
  • Raise your legs – Feet and ankles can swell from sitting too long in one position (taking a long flight to grandma’s house for the holidays, for example) or if you’ve been on your feet all day (shopping, baking or cooking). Elevate your legs to reduce swelling. Lay or sit and lift your legs above your heart.
  • Wear smart shoes – OK, so you’ll never give up your sparkly high heels when it’s time for that special soiree. But for other holiday activities such as shopping, traveling or cooking, ditch the high heels. When you know you’ll be on your feet all day, wear comfortable shoes with good arch support and a padded sole.
  • Get help – Feet shouldn’t hurt all the time. Persistent foot pain can be an indication of injury, irritation or illness. See a podiatrist if you experience pain; don’t wait until the holidays end.

Excerpted from American Podiatric Medical Association, Inc. | Not affiliated with Aetrex Worldwide

For more info: http://www.apma.org/Learn/HealthyFeetTips.cfm?ItemNumber=9850

The Ultimate Healthy Holiday Wish List!

For me, living a healthy lifestyle is a top priority. The holidays are a great time to stock your kitchen and pantry with gifts that will help you prepare healthy, convenient meals for your family throughout the year. So this year, I am putting together my “Ultimate Healthy Holiday Wish List!” These gifts are a great way to boost your health at home and they can all be easily found on Amazon, so just add them to your Amazon wish list and call it a day!

Instant Pot: This amazing kitchen appliance is a constant staple in my kitchen. I am not good about planning meals ahead of time and this makes it possible for me to throw something together quickly while keeping it healthy. I make a lot of soups in it (great way to sneak in veggies for the kids) as well as tons of other delicious meals and desserts.

Air Fryer: I like this version because it doesn’t use toxic non-stick coating like some. The air fryer is a great way to make some family favorites in a healthier oil-free way (think sweet potato fries, chicken cutlets etc). In my research, this is the best version that doesn’t contain the nasty non-stick coating which I always try to avoid!

Immersion Blender: This is a lifesaver for me with trying to get my kids to eat enough veggies. I make a nice batch of veggie soup and blend it all together so the kids don’t see all the veggies. It’s also great for making drinks and smoothies. I love that this tool doesn’t take up much space in the kitchen, too!

Spiralizer: I love this for making veggie noodles. I’ve made zucchini, carrot, beet, sweet potato, and even butternut squash noodles! You can sautée them, add them to soups or even eat some raw in your salad depending on what you use to make them. The kids love watching the “noodles” come out and they are much more likely to eat them when cooking is fun.

Bees Wax Wrap: I try to avoid plastic whenever possible. Bees wax wrap is a great, more natural alternative that will help to keep your food fresh. Not to mention, it cuts down on waste in the landfills since it is reusable.

Sonicare FlexCare Platinum Electric Toothbrush: I have always been a “hard” brusher when it comes to my teeth. As a result, my gums are starting to recede a bit. A dental hygienist friend of mine recommended this toothbrush which will help to train me to brush with the proper pressure by alerting me when I am brushing too hard. Definitely on my wish list this year! I gotta get my mouth in check!

Waterpik: In keeping with the theme of healthy gums, I am upping the ante and wishing for a waterpik this year. More effective than regular floss, my friend who is a hygienist said this will help to boost my gum health and strength.

Hopefully this helps to inspire you and give you some gift ideas for yourself or those you love. I wish you a Happy Holiday Season & Happy, Healthy Shopping!

DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.

Prevent & Treat White Spots On Your Nails

White spots or discoloration is a common issue amongst individuals of all age groups and mostly develops around the cuticle of finger nails or toe nails. When we bump our toes on a hard surface, the impact can cause minor damage to the root of the nail, leading to whitish areas that disappear when the nail grows out.

However, in some cases white discoloration or spots under nails is a result of a more serious issue. If the discoloration in your nail does not disappear, increases in size or is associated with changes in the texture of nails (like thickening, yellowing, splitting or separation from nail-bed), you should consult a healthcare professional for an evaluation.

Apart from an obvious nail injury, there are several causes of white spots on toenails listed below that should be evaluated.

  1. Improperly Fitted Footwear: Improper footwear (use of wrong size, either too big to too small) can cause extra stress or strain on the feet, including the toenails, which can cause damage that may lead to development of white spots.
  2. Fungal Nail Infection: Some people are more prone to fungal infections than others. For example, individuals who wear shoes for long periods of time, especially in hot humid environments, are prone to develop fungal infections. Toenail fungus can be picked up in damp areas such as public gyms, shower stalls or swimming pools, and can be passed among family members. Athletes and people who wear tight-fitting shoes or tight hosiery that cause trauma to the toes or keep the feet from drying out are at higher risk. The condition can also spread from one toe to another, or to other parts of the body. Other risk factors include abnormal PH level of the skin, not drying off the feet thoroughly after bathing or exercise, and a compromised immune system in someone who has been exposed to a fungus. Diabetics have an increased risk of contracting a toenail fungus because their immune system is compromised. They should have their nails cut and debrided by a podiatrist.
  3. Nutrient Deficiency: Deficiency of certain nutrients can also be associated with changes in the texture of nails, skin, and hair. White spots on toenails are typically an indication of deficiency of calcium, an essential mineral that is associated with strong bones. In addition, zinc deficiency is also associated with changes in nail and skin.
  4. Allergy: An allergy to cosmetic products like nail enamels, thinners, nail polish removers and nail hardeners can also cause white spots on toenails because of irritation due to allergens. The allergic response may be limited to nails, but can also include skin surrounding nail surfaces.

How Can I Treat White Spots on My Toenails?

There are many wonderful natural remedies that can be tried before seeking medication to treat the white posts on your nails. The results may not happen as quickly when using natural remedies, but they can be effective over time, and much less toxic to the body.

Tea Tree Oil: The most active ingredients of tea tree oil that is responsible for its anti-fungal properties are 1.8-cineole and terpinen-4-ol. In addition to hindering fungal growth, tea tree oil is also helpful in managing the growth of other microbial agents without causing any damage to nails or surrounding skin. You can use 100% tea tree oil applied topically 3 to 4 times a daily after scraping the fungal lesions.

Vinegar Soaks: The acetic acid in vinegar is responsible for its anti- fungal properties. You can prepare a 1:1 solution of vinegar and water, then soak your feet for 30 minutes once daily to help decrease the fungal or microbial growth.

Dietary Approach: An anti-fungal diet can also help reduce fungal growth in the body overall. Eliminating foods containing sugar or sweeteners, white/processed foods, dairy and anything containing yeast/gluten can be effective. There are many versions of the Candida Diet, each with different variations, and they can be very effective in eliminating fungus from the body.

How Do I Prevent Fungus From Spreading?

Because it is difficult to treat or eradicate toenail fungus, it is a good idea to try to prevent it. It helps to wear protective shoes or sandals in public showers, pool areas and gyms, and to avoid borrowing someone else’s shoes or sharing socks or towels with someone who has toenail fungus. An orthotic device can be used to add cushioning and/or control over-pronation, support the longitudinal arch, and reduce stress on the lower leg muscles. Wash your feet regularly, and dry them thoroughly when they get wet. Wearing nail polish on the toes is not advised because it can seal in fungus and allow it to grow. Keep toenails trimmed, and be sure to disinfect any pedicure tools before using them. If you do develop toenail fungus, see your foot doctor.

DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.

Liver & Kidney Detox Support

The holidays are officially upon us! ‘Tis the season for overindulgence. With all the high fat foods, sweets, alcohol and overeating in general, our livers are under a lot of stress this time of year.

One of my favorite ways to naturally support the liver & kidneys is by drinking Dandelion Root Tea. After an evening of overdoing it, a cup of this tea is just what the doctor ordered.

Some of the benefits of Dandelion Root Tea include:

  • Reduce the risk of UTI’s (urinary tract infections)
  • Purifies & detoxes bladder and kidneys
  • Reduce congestion of the liver
  • Improve digestion by helping break down fats, which supports weight loss
  • Purify blood, regulate blood sugar and improve circulation
  • Support healthy skin
  • Reduce bloating and aches and pains

One of my favorite brands of tea is traditional medicinals. It’s organic and doesn’t contain any added preservatives. So go – enjoy the holidays – just be sure to support your body in recovery and get yourself back on the path to wellness!

DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.