Soothe Joint Pain Naturally

Joint pain can really limit our ability to participate in the activities we love, and often take for granted until we aren’t able to do them anymore. Joint pain is typically cause by a form of arthritis, and can limit our mobility. Luckily, there are some great natural remedies that can soothe your pain naturally, making it easier to participate in the things you love.

joint-soak

Epsom Salt Soak

Epsom salt contains magnesium sulfate, a naturally occurring mineral that has been used to get relief from pain for years because of its high levels of magnesium. To soak, simply add 1/2 cup of Epsom salt to a large bowl of warm water, stir it and soak your joints for at least 1 minutes.

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Olive Oil Massage

A main compound in extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) called oleocanthal inhibits inflammatory enzymes COX-1 and COX-2, just like Advil or aspirin does. The study showed that 1 ½ tablespoons is equal to 200-mg of ibuprofen. Make sure the oil is extra virgin olive oil or “cold-pressed.” The ripeness of the olives at the time they were pressed determines the levels present. To massage, rub some olive oil (about 1 TBSP) onto your joints 2-3 times a day and gently rub.

essential oils

Essential Oils

Peppermint and eucalyptus have analgesic, or pain-relieving, properties. They are very cooling oils, and can temporarily soothe your discomfort. To use, blend 5-10 drops of both eucalyptus and peppermint oil together, and then mix into 1-2 tablespoons of olive or coconut oil (known as the “carrier” oil). You MUST dilute the essential oil or it may irritate your skin. Be sure to keep your blended oil in a dark glass bottle out of direct sunlight to maintain potency.

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Turmeric & Ginger

Turmeric is a bright yellow herb that has been used in cooking, dyes and Ayurvedic medicine in India and China for 2,000 years. Turmeric has recently drawn attention from Western health practitioners for the treatment of arthritis and other musculoskeletal conditions. Please note: turmeric can cause side effects, specifically thinning of the blood, so please consult a practitioner before starting this herbal treatment. Dr. Andrew Weil recommends combining turmeric with ginger for natural relief of inflammation. Ginger contains anti-inflammatory compounds that reduce swelling and stiffness. Take both herbs together in capsules at the same time, or make a tea, brewing a one-inch piece of each herb in two cups of boiling water for 15 to 30 minutes. Remove the herbs and add honey or stevia to sweeten if desired.

By using some of these readily available natural remedies, you can support your body and help soother your pain without the use of medications. Treat your body well, and it will treat you well in return!

DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.

Dangers of Low Magnesium Levels

Magnesium is one of the six essential minerals that comprise 99% of the body’s mineral content. Magnesium helps build bones, supports nerve function, and is essential to converting food to energy.

Magnesium has been shown to to help with conditions such as headaches, chronic pain, asthma, anxiety, muscle tension and sleep disorders. Unfortunately, most Americans are seriously lacking magnesium. Magnesium deficiency, especially prevalent in older populations, is linked to insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, coronary heart disease, and osteoporosis.

According the Medical News Today, “The Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) for magnesium depends on age and gender. The National Institutes of Health recommend that children 1-3 years of age get 80 milligrams of magnesium a day, rising to 130 milligrams for children aged 4-8, and 240 milligrams for children aged 9-13. After the age of 14, RDAs diverge for men and women, with men typically requiring more magnesium than women due to a larger average body mass. At the age of 14-18, the RDA for males is 410 milligrams, and 360 milligrams for females. Adult females are advised to get 310-320 milligrams per day. An RDA of 350-400 milligrams is advised during pregnancy, and 310-360 milligrams when breastfeeding. The RDA of magnesium for adult males is 400-420 milligrams.”

So what are some ways you can improve your magnesium intake?

Magnesium Rich Foods

Whenever possible, it’s always best to obtain your vitamins and minerals naturally from a food source. Some foods you can incorporate into your diet that are high in magnesium include: sunflower seeds, almonds, sesame seeds, spinach, cashews, black beans, oatmeal, broccoli, peanut butter, shrimp, brown rice, kidney beans and bananas.

Magnesium Supplements

According to DrAxe.com, “It’s believed that magnesium in citrate, chelate and chloride forms are absorbed better than magnesium supplements in oxide and magnesium sulfate form. Here’s a bit about the different types of magnesium supplements that you’ll likely come across:

  • Magnesium Chelate – highly absorbable by the body and the kind found in foods naturally. This type is bound to multiple amino acids (proteins) and used to restore magnesium levels.
  • Magnesium Citrate – magnesium combined with citric acid. This may have a laxative effect in some cases when taken in high doses, but is otherwise safe to use for improving digestion and preventing constipation.
  • Magnesium Chloride Oil – an oil form of magnesium that can be applied to skin. It’s also given to people who have digestive disorders that prevent normal absorption of magnesium from their food. Athletes sometimes use magnesium oil to increase energy and endurance, to dull muscle pain, and to heal wounds or skin irritation.
  • Magnesium Glycinate – highly absorbable, this is recommended for anyone with a known magnesium deficiency and less likely to cause laxative effects than some other magnesium supplements.
  • Magnesium Threonate – has a high level of absorbability since it can penetrate the mitochondrial membrane. This type is not as readily available, but as more research is conducted, it may become more widely used.”

So if you feel you have been suffering from any of the above conditions or you could benefit from increasing your magnesium intake, consider supplementing or incorporating more magnesium rich foods into your diet.

DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.

Detoxing Through Your Feet

There’s nothing more relaxing for tired feet than a great foot soak at the end of the day. By adding some simple ingredients to your foot soak, you can increase the healing properties of your foot soak, and boost the overall health benefits.

Bentonite clay is well known for its ability to pull toxin out when it comes into contact with the body. Epsom salts are said to break down into magnesium and sulfate in the water, then your body absorbs the minerals through the skin, and then “draw out” toxins from the body. Lavender oil is well known for its soothing and calming properties.

My favorite add-ins include:

To set up a foot detox bath, start by getting a large tub or bowl. Mix 1/2 cup of epsom salts in to 6 quarts of hot water and let it dissolve. While waiting, mix 2 TBSP of bentonite clay with 1 TBSP of apple cider vinegar and apply to your feet. Leave it on until it dries (about 10-15 minutes). Add 5-10 drops of lavender essential oil to the water and place your feet in the tub. Soak for about 15 minutes and you can use a pumice stone or natural bristle brush to help remove the clay and/or dead skin.

DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.

 

Avoid Cold & Flu This Winter

‘Tis the season – cold & flu season. It seems the Northeast is getting hit very hard this year with all sorts of illnesses: flu, strep, stomach bug, you name it. As a certified health coach, I believe many illnesses commonly suffered can be avoided by making simple dietary changes and supplementing with natural immune support when needed. Rather than relying on pharmacies and prescriptions, I like to give my body the natural support it needs to fight off illness and feel its best. When your body is functioning optimally, it is much less likely to get sick, and if you do get sick, the duration will be much shorter.

Some of my all time favorite winter supplements include:

  • Organic Elderberry Syrup: A powerful antiviral that tastes great too! Perfect for fighting off the flu.
  • Garlic: Anti-microbial power that is great for boosting the immune system. It’s most powerful when eaten raw, so I like to chop it up and use in in dips like guacamole and hummus.
  • Young Living Thieves Essential Oil: An anti-microbial blend of essential oils that supports the immune system. I like to diffuse it to clear the air of germs, clean with it, apply it to the soles of my feet to prevent illness and it can also be taken internally as well.
  • Epsom Salt Bath: A relaxing way to pull toxins out of the body. I like to mix lavender essential oil to boost relaxation and reduce stress as well.
  • Probiotics: Replenishing your body’s “good” bacteria will help you to fight off the “bad” bacteria that cause illness. Improving the function of your gut is vital, as this is where the majority of your immune system dwells.
  • Alive Organic Vitamin C powder: Vitamin C can help reduce the duration and severity of colds. Unlike many chemically processed vitamins, this food-based supplement is easily assimilated and digested.

Of course, supplements are great to help support your body, but it is also essential that you maintain a healthy, balanced diet to keep your body feeling its best. Reducing or eliminating sugar is essential to good health. One of the reasons so many people get sick during the holidays is because of the high consumption of sugar, which compromises the immune system. I also like to suggest limiting or eliminating dairy products, as these are mucous producing, which is obviously not ideal during cold and flu season. You don’t have to live a life of total deprivation but making sure your diet and supplementation focuses on whole foods, with little processed “junk” food can really work wonders for your health! Here’s to a happy, healthy winter!

DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.