Remedies For Swollen Feet While Pregnant

With my first pregnancy I remember having swollen feet toward the end of the pregnancy. It seemed as if none of my shoes fit properly. I was grateful for my clogs and flip flops which seemed to be the only shoes that could handle my extra wide feet! I wish I had known then what I know now. There are some great natural ways you can manage swollen feet while pregnant.

Elevate Your Feet

To help reduce swelling, be sure to sit with your feet elevated slightly above your heart for at least 20 minutes about 4 times a day. This can help to bring the blood back to your heart and out of your feet/legs.

Skip The Caffeine

Caffeine is a natural diuretic, which means it increases urination, which in turn causes dehydration. When the body is in a state of dehydration, it holds onto fluid, which can cause swelling. Rather than drinking coffee or caffeinated tea, you can opt for herbal caffeine free tea, or a coffee alternative like Teecino or Dandy Blend.

Epsom Salt Foot Soak

Soak your feet in a tub of warm water with a 2:1 water to Epsom salt ratio. So, for every cup of water, you should use ½ cup Epsom salt. I also like to add lavender EO to increase relaxation benefits. Do this nightly for continued benefits.

Dandelion/Nettle Tea

Dandelion and nettle are great for improving overall circulation and maintaining electrolyte balance within the body. Sipping 1-2 cups of dandelion/nettle tea a day can help to reduce overall swelling.

Exercise Regularly

30 minutes of light exercise daily can be a great way to boost your circulation, making it less likely for fluids to settle in your feet/legs. You can consider gentle exercises like prenatal yoga or walking if you have not been regularly exercising before pregnancy.

DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.

Foods To Help Reduce Edema/Swelling

Diet can be a truly powerful tool. Each time we eat, we are either nourishing and  supporting our bodies, or we are doing a bit of damage. Using food as a healing tool can be very powerful. My daughter used to suffer from chronic illness as a child, and through dietary changes, she is now thriving and extremely healthy. If you suffer from edema/swelling, there are some foods you should avoid, and some foods you can add, to get yourself back to balance.

Foods to add: Foods that have diuretic properties will help to reduce the amount of fluid your body holds on to. Watermelon, asparagus, parsley, beets, grapes, green beans, leafy greens, cucumbers, pineapples, pumpkins, onions, leeks and garlic can all help to reduce the amount of swelling in your body. Incorporating several of these into a salad or smoothie each day may help to reduce the amount of fluid your body is retaining.

Foods to avoid: Anything that causes fluid retention should definitely be avoided if you are suffering from edema. Alcohol, caffeine, chocolate, dairy products, animal protein, dried shellfish, fried foods, gravies, olives, pickles, salt, soy sauce, tobacco, white flour and white sugar are all known to cause fluid retention. By avoiding these foods, you can help to limit the amount of fluid your body holds on to.

Although every body is different and different foods are good for some and bad for others, following these general guidelines can be helpful in reducing your swelling. Trying to avoid packaged/processed foods is always a good thing to help your body find balance. Practicing self-care with things like regular massage, sitting with your feet up and stretching can help to keep your circulation moving.

DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.