Signs of Disease Your Feet May Be Telling You

Often, we don’t give our feet enough credit! They can be a great indicator of potential health issues. Keep a close eye on your feet and be sure to consult with a medical professional if you observe any of the following changes:

Bald toes: If you notice that you suddenly lose all the hair on your toes, this could be an indication of poor circulation caused by arterial disease. It’s possible you could be suffering from a buildup of plaque in the leg arteries, which happens to approximately 8 million Americans, according to Dr. Suzanne Fuchs of North Shore University Hospital in New York.

Foot ulcers: If you notice you are developing foot ulcers that have difficulty healing, this could be a sign of diabetes. Uncontrolled glucose levels can damage nerves and cause poor circulation, making it difficult for blood to reach the feet. As a result, skin has a hard time healing properly. Foot ulcers are often a first indicator of diabetes, so be sure to get your blood sugar checked if you are experiencing foot ulcers.

Red streaks under toenails: You could have broken blood vessels known as splinter hemorrhages which happen when small blood clots damage the tiny capillaries under the nails. They can be a sign of endocarditis, which is an infection of the heart’s inner lining. This infection can result in heart failure if left untreated, so please seek medical treatment if you notice red streaks or lines under your toenails.

Dry or cracked skin: Dry, cracked or flaky skin can be a sign of a thyroid condition. If moisturizer doesn’t work to heal your dry skin, it could be a result of the thyroid not producing proper thyroid hormones, which control metabolic rate, blood pressure, tissue growth, and skeletal and nervous system development.

If you are experiencing any of these foot health issues, be sure to seek medical attention to ensure your symptoms are not indicative of a more serious disease.

DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.

The Health Benefits of Asparagus

Asparagus is truly a super food. It has many amazing health benefits, on top of tasting absolutely delicious! Asparagus is great for the thyroid, liver, spleen and pancreas.

This time of year, our livers take a beating with all the holiday celebrations, so asparagus is a great way to help off-set that a bit. Asparagus also has natural pain relieving properties, helping to reduce inflammation in the body.

I found this interesting write up on SmithsonianMag.com about why asparagus makes our urine smell when we eat it. “Asparagusic acid, as the name implies, is (to our knowledge) only found in asparagus. When our bodies digest the vegetable, they break down this chemical into a group of related sulfur-containing compounds with long, complicated names (including dimethyl sulfide, dimethyl disulfide, dimethyl sulfoxide and dimethyl sulfone). As with many other substances that include sulfur—such as garlic, skunk spray and odorized natural gas—these sulfur-containing molecules convey a powerful, typically unpleasant scent.”

I personally love the taste of asparagus. I love it roasted in the oven with garlic powder, salt and pepper (simple yet tasty) and I LOVE it in soups! My kids won’t eat roasted asparagus but they will eat it when I blend it into a soup!

One of my favorite recipes is my LOVE YOUR THYROID SOUP! It’s vey easy to make and a great way to sneak more asparagus into your diet.

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons olive oil
1 onion, chopped
2 stalks of celery, chopped
2 carrots, chopped
1 clove of garlic, minced
2 red potatoes, chopped
3 cups asparagus, chopped into 1 inch pieces, woody ends removed
5 cups of chicken stock/bone broth (or vegetable stock if making this vegan)
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 tsp dulse or kelp flakes

Method:
Sautee carrots, onions, garlic and celery until vegetables are soft (about 2 minutes) in the olive oil. Add the potatoes, broth, asparagus and dulse/kelp. Bring to a boil, then simmer for 15 minutes. Use your immersion blender to make it nice and creamy! I like to add a splash of hot sauce or lemon juice to mine for a little extra zing! It’s also great if you add some sautéed portobello mushrooms after you’ve blended! Enjoy!
DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.

Could It Be Adrenal Fatigue?

Daily living causes much stress, which is not easy on the adrenal glands. Because of the high-stress society we live in, many of us are unknowingly suffering from adrenal fatigue. As we approach the holiday season, stress increases significantly for many of us.

The adrenal glands (also known as suprarenal glands) are the triangle-shaped endocrine glands that sit atop the kidneys. They are chiefly responsible for regulating the stress response through the synthesis of corticosteroids and catecholamine, including cortisol and adrenaline.

When the adrenals are tired, the body may experience a number of different symptoms.

The most common symptoms caused by tired or worn-out adrenal glands are:

  • Excessive sweating or perspiration from little activity
  • Excessive sweating or perspiration from little activity
  • Lower back pain and/or knee weakness or pain, especially on the side
  • Dark circles under the eyes
  • Dizziness
  • Muscle twitches
  • Low blood sugar
  • Heart palpitations
  • Sensitivity to light, or difficulty seeing at night
  • Cravings for salt
  • Low stamina for stress, and easily irritated
  • Excessive mood responses after eating carbohydrates such as pasta, breads and sugar
  • Chronic infections (bacterial, viral, fungal, yeast)
  • Low blood pressure
  • Light-headedness upon standing up
  • Tired but wired feeling, poor sleep
  • Cravings for sweets and carbs, intolerance to alcohol
  • Premature aging
  • Dry, unhealthy skin with excess pigmentation
  • Lack of libido
  • Cystic breasts
  • Tendency to startle easily
  • Negative response to thyroid hormone

If you suspect you might have tired adrenals, address it right away. Adrenal glands are extremely important to a healthy immune system. They are necessary for proper thyroid function.

Natural Ways to Support Your Adrenals

  • Get some sleep. You must rest if you are going to help your adrenals get stronger. That means going to bed every night by 10 p.m. Make this a priority and stick with it. Your adrenals need their beauty sleep!
  • Eliminate sugar and processed carbs. Sugar and simple carbs (junk!) put stress on the adrenals. Adrenal glands help to regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Eat clean animal protein foods, organic vegetables, fruits, nuts, legumes, beans and grains.
  • Quit the coffee habit and drink plenty of fresh filtered water every day.

“What is Adrenal Fatigue?” www.adrenalfatigue.org

“Are You Tired and Wired?: Your Proven 30 Day Plan for Overcoming Adrenal Fatigue and Feeling Fantastic Again.” Marcelle Pick. 2011

DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.

Are You Deficient In Iodine? You May Be At Risk…

Iodine deficiency is a silent epidemic. Iodine is typically found in iodized table salt and in sea vegetables. In the American culture, we have decreased our use of table salt and eat almost no sea vegetables. As a result, there is an alarmingly high amount of Americans who unknowingly suffer from iodine deficiency.

Iodine is essential and especially crucial for brain development in children. It also plays a central role in healthy function of your thyroid gland. Inadequate iodine intake can lead to weight gain, depression, decreased energy, various cancers and heart disease! As you can see it is crucial to ensure that your body is getting sufficient iodine intake.

Adding sea vegetables into your diet is a great way to boost your iodine intake without having to increase your sodium intake. In our house, I sprinkle dulse or kelp granules on many of our meals to ensure we are getting adequate iodine intake. Sushi rolls are also a great way to increase your sea vegetable intake. I also use kombu when cooking beans or grains, which adds iodine and makes them easier to digest. If you choose to use salt as a source of iodine, be sure to use iodized salt.

The following are a few great food based items that you can incorporate into your diet to naturally boost your iodine intake:

DISCLAIMER:  The information contained on this site is not provided by medical professionals and is provided for informational purposes only.  The information on this site is not meant to substitute consulting with your podiatrist, doctor or other health care professional. The information available on or through this site is in no way intended to diagnose, influence treatment or cure any foot or other health problems nor is it a substitute for the services or advice of a podiatrist, physician, or health professional.  You should always consult a physician licensed in your state in all matters relating to your health.